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"Everybody Street" illuminates the lives and work of New York's iconic street photographers and the incomparable city that has inspired them for decades. The documentary pays tribute to the spirit of street photography through a cinematic exploration of New York City, and captures the visceral rush, singular perseverance and at times immediate danger customary to these artists.

CHERYL DUNN, Director

Cheryl Dunn is a documentary filmmaker and street photographer based in New York City. Her films have played at numerous film festivals including Tribeca, Edinburgh, Rotterdam, Los Angeles and Havana, and on PBS. Her work has been exhibited in various galleries and museums including Deitch Projects in New York, The Tate Modern in London, and the  “Art in the Streets ” exhibition at the Geffen Contemporary MOCA.  Cheryl was one of the subjects the documentary, book & traveling museum exhibition “Beautiful Losers”. She has had two books of her photographs published - Bicycle Gangs of New York ,and Some Kinda Vocation.

LUCY COOPER, Producer

Lucy has been a producer on a number of high-profile independent films, including “Hesher”, “Transamerica”, and “A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints”, which have gone on to play at Sundance, Cannes, Venice and Berlin film festivals, as well as receive Oscar nominations, and Independent Spirit and Golden Globe wins.  She has also produced a long list of music videos and commercials for brands like Nike, Johnnie Walker, and DIRECTV. 

BRUCE DAVIDSON is undeniably one of the most influential and important photographers of our time. Picking up a camera at the age of ten, Davidson quickly found himself on the streets of Chicago, photographing city life. After attending Rochester Institute of Technology and Yale University, Davidson was drafted in the army and stationed near Paris, where he first met Henri Cartier-Bresson. In 1957, after his service ended, Davidson starting working for Life Magazine and became a full-time member of Magnum in 1958.

From 1958 to 1961, Davidson made some of his most seminal bodies of work, including Brooklyn Gang. After a one-person show at The Museum of Modern Art in 1963, followed by a National Endowment for the Arts grant in 1967, Davidson spent two years photographing in Harlem, resulting in East 100th Street, one of the most powerful documentations of poverty and housing discrimination ever published. In 1980, after living in New York City for 23 years, Davidson turned his camera underground, creating a startling color essay of urban life in Subway.

Classic bodies of work from his 50-year career have been extensively published in monographs and are included in many major public and private fine art collections around the world, and he continues to photograph and produce new bodies of work. He has had one-man exhibitions at The Museum of Modern Art, The Smithsonian Museum of American Art, The Walker Art Center, The International Center of Photography, The Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego, The Aperture Foundation, and The Foundacion Cartier-Bresson in Paris.

ELLIOTT ERWITT is one of the most well known living street photographers. He has been a member of Magnum Photos since 1953, and has over twenty books published of his work. He studied photography at Los Angeles City College and in 1946 met Edward Steichen, Robert Capa and Roy Stryker, who became significant mentors. Erwitt has continued to travel and photograph throughout his life, capturing the famous and the ordinary, the strange and the mundane in his own unmistakable, often humorous style. His books, journalistic essays, and advertisements have been featured in publications around the world and his work has been exhibited at such museums as the Smithsonian, MoMA, Kunsthaus in Zurich, and The Art Institute of Chicago.

JILL FREEDMAN is a highly respected New York City documentary photographer whose award-winning work is included in the permanent collections of The Museum of Modern Art, the International Center of Photography, George Eastman House, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the New York Public Library, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and the Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris, among others. She is known for having completely embedded herself with her subjects, as in her long-term documentary projects on firemen, street cops, and a traveling circus. She has appeared in solo and group exhibitions throughout the world, and has had seven books of her work published.

BRUCE GILDEN’s childhood in Brooklyn endowed him with a keen eye for observing urban behaviors and customs. His curiosity about strong characters and individual peculiarities has been present from the beginning of his career, and he has been photographing on the streets of New York City since 1981. Getting ever closer to his subject, he has established an expressive and theatrical style that presented the world as a vast comedy of manners. His first major project, which he worked on until 1986, focused on Coney Island, and on the intimacy of the sensual, fat or skinny bodies sprawled across the legendary New York beach. There have been several monographs published of his work, including Facing New York (Cornerhouse 1992), Coney Island (1999), and A Beautiful Catastrophe (powerhouse 2005). He has travelled and exhibited widely around the world, and has been a member of Magnum Photos since 1998. He has received numerous awards, including the European Award for Photography, three National Endowment for the Arts fellowships, and a Japan Foundation fellowship.

REBECCA LEPKOFF has been photographing New York City since the late 1930’s. Associated with the Photo League, she captured the ethnic richness of life on the Lower East Side and preserved that culture on vintage silver prints. In the words of Tom Gitterman, “With a background of modern dance and art history, she photographed with a strong sense of light and abstraction and captured the rhythm of the street. Beyond mere documents of a time and place, her images provide greater insight into human existence within the city. Her work captures the energy of the hustle and bustle, the commerce, the elegance and the complexities of modern society and the plight of the individual within it.” Lepkoff’s photographs are included in such prestigious collections as the National Museum of Art (Washington D.C.) the National Gallery of Canada, the Museum of the City of New York, the Bank of America and the Consolidated Freightways, Inc. Collection.”

MARY ELLEN MARK has achieved worldwide visibility through her numerous books, exhibitions and editorial magazine work. She has published photo-essays and portraits in such publications as LIFE, New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, Rolling Stone, and Vanity Fair. For over four decades, she has traveled extensively to make pictures that reflect a high degree of humanism. Today, she is recognized as one of our most respected and influential photographers in the world. Her images of diverse cultures have become landmarks in the field of documentary photography. Her portrayals of Mother Teresa, Indian circuses, and brothels in Bombay were the product of many years of work in India. A photo essay on runaway children in Seattle became the basis of the academy award nominated film STREETWISE, directed and photographed by her husband, Martin Bell. She has published eighteen books, and her photographs have been exhibited worldwide.

Her accolades include the Cornell Capa Award by the International Center of Photography, the Infinity Award for Journalism, an Erna & Victor Hasselblad Foundation Grant, and a Walter Annenberg Grant. Among her other awards are the John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship, the Matrix Award for outstanding woman in the field of film/photography, and the Dr. Erich Salomon Award for outstanding merits in the field of journalistic photography. She was also presented with honorary Doctor of Fine Arts degrees from her Alma Mater, the University of Pennsylvania and the University of the Arts; three fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts; the Photographer of the Year Award from the Friends of Photography; the World Press Award for Outstanding Body of Work Throughout the Years; the Victor Hasselblad Cover Award; two Robert F. Kennedy Awards; and the Creative Arts Award Citation for Photography at Brandeis University.

JEFF MERMELSTEIN is a photographer’s photographer. Schooled on the streets of New York in the instant reflex art of Cartier-Bresson, his pictures are populated by people captured for their own idiosyncrasies and humanity; for their own unique way of walking, talking, eating, working, drinking, celebrating and being. Relentless in his observations, Mermelstein’s photographs challenge us by first appealing to our sense of identification in others who function with all the vagaries of complex human behavior.

Glenn O’Brien wrote that Jeff Mermelstein is “one of the great snapshot artists of all time”. His bibliography includes the three monographs: SideWalk (Dewi Lewis Publishing 1999), No Title Here (powerHouse Books 2003), and Twirl / Run (powerhouse Books 2009). His accomplishments include an Aaron Siskind Foundation Fellowship and The European Publishers Award for Photography, as well as frequent and numerous placement in magazines such as The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, Artforum and DoubleTake His work is in collections including The Art Institute of Chicago, The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, The Buhl Collection, NYC, The International Center of Photography, and The JP Morgan Chase Art Collection

JOEL MEYEROWITZ is an award-winning photographer whose work has appeared in over 350 exhibitions in museums and galleries around the world. He was born in New York in 1938. He began photographing in 1962. As an early advocate of color photography in the mid 1960’s, Meyerowitz was instrumental in changing the attitude toward the use of color photography from one of resistance to nearly universal acceptance. His first book, Cape Light, is considered a classic work of color photography and has sold more than 100,000 copies during its 30-year life. He is the author of 17 other books, including the newly released book by Aperture, Legacy: The Preservation of Wilderness in New York City Parks. Meyerowitz is a two time Guggenheim fellow, a recipient of both the NEA and NEH awards, as well as a recipient of the Deutscher Fotobuchpreis. His work is in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art, the Boston Museum of Fine Art and many others.

MARTHA COOPER picked up photography at the age of 3, graduated high school at the age of 16, and finished college by the age of 19. After becoming a staff photographer for the New York Post in the 1970’s, she began photographing children in bombed-out neighborhoods in lower Manhattan, which later formed the book Street Play. Through these children she learned of graffiti writers, and began to document the very beginnings of street art. She is world-renowned for seminal work Subway Art, in which she almost singlehandedly documented the subway graffiti movement of 1970’s New York. A beloved figure in the street art community, she continues to document graffiti culture. Her work has been published in numerous magazines including National Geographic, Natural History, and Vibe, as well as exhibited in galleries and museums worldwide.

JAMEL SHABAZZ has gained international recognition through his various books, exhibitions, and editorial works documenting urban life and the African American community. Born and raised in Brooklyn, Shabazz picked up his first camera at the age of 15 and began to record the world around him. His massive body of fine art, documentary, and fashion photography has manifested itself in five monographs of his work. In addition to his own photography, Shabazz teaches at numerous community organizations that teach high school students various forms of art, photography, communication, and social responsibility. His photographs are part of permanent collections at the Whitney Museum, the Bronx Museum of the arts and the Schomburg center for research in black culture.

CLAYTON PATTERSON (born October 9, 1948 in Calgary, Alberta, Canada) is a Canadian-born artist, photographer, videographer and folk historian. Since moving to New York City in 1979, his work has focused almost exclusively on documenting the art, life and times of the Lower East Side in Manhattan. in 1980 he began photographing life in the Lower East Side of New York City. In 1985, Patterson began photographing kids from the neighborhood in front of his front door. Over the years, he has taken hundreds of photos, and displaying them on his “Hall of Fame” in his storefront window. in 1980 he began photographing life in the Lower East Side of New York City.In 1985, Patterson began photographing kids from the neighborhood in front of his front door. Over the years, he has taken hundreds of photos, and displaying them on his “Hall of Fame” in his storefront window.

RICKY POWELL, b 1961 is a native New Yorker who has been taking pictures professionally since 1985. Known as one of the leading photographers of the New York music scene, especially rap and hip hop, Ricky has shot numerous performers including Run DMC, the Beastie Boys, LL Cool J, Method Man and Cyprus Hill. his main forte is street photography, Ricky says, “Street photography is like my transistor radio: the play list is infinite.” His public access show ,  Rappin’ With the Rickster  which aired from 1990–1996, has often been called the world’s hippest-ever public access TV show, as Powell gave insight into the artistic phenomena of the day, with an excess of candid footage, impromptu interviews, and a vision of Powell’s New York

BOOGIE - Vladimir Milivojevich, better known as Boogie, b. 1969, is a Serbian photographer . With his camera, Boogie walked the streets day and night, recording the degradation of his city, unruly protests and portraits of skinheads. After winning the United States green card lottery in 1997, Boogie moved from Belgrade to Brooklyn, a week before the war in Kosovo began. He started observing New York’s bleak street side of life with monochrome shots. His book  “It’s all good” ,is one of the best NY photo books of all time.  Shot in New York Citys most notorious neighborhoods—Bushwick, Bedford-Stuyvesant, and Queensbridge—Boogie gained intimate access into a world few dare to venture, a world closed to outsiders, a world of crackheads, junkies, and gangsters.. he has published 4 books since.

MAX KOZLOFF (born 1933) is an American Art Historian, art critic of modern art and photographer. He has been art editor at The Nation, and Executive Editor of Artforum. His essay, “American Painting During the Cold War” is of particular importance to the criticism on American Abstract Expressionism. he became an art photographer, and in the following years held numerous shows and became a photography critic. He received the 1968 Guggenheim Fellowship and later the Infinity Award for Writing in 1990, given by the International Center of Photography.

LUC SANTE (born 1954) is a writer and critic. Born in Verviers, Belgium, Sante emigrated to the United States in the early 1960s. He attended school in New York City, first at Regis High School in Manhattan and later at Columbia University. His books include Low Life (1991), Evidence (1992), The Factory of Facts (1998), Walker Evans (1999), Kill All Your Darlings: Pieces 1990-2005 (2007), and Folk Photography (2009) Sante received a Whiting Writer’s Award in 1989, a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1992-93, a Literature Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 1997, a Grammy for album notes in 1998 (Sante was one of the album note writers for the 1997 re-issue of the Anthology of American Folk Music), and an Infinity Award for writing from the International Center of Photography in 2010

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“Everybody Street” illuminates the lives and work of New York’s iconic street photographers and the incomparable city that has inspired them for decades. The documentary pays tribute to the spirit of street photography through a cinematic exploration of New York City, and captures the visceral rush, singular perseverance and at times immediate danger customary to these artists.

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"Everybody Street" illuminates the lives and work of New York's iconic street photographers and the incomparable city that has inspired them for decades. The documentary pays tribute to the spirit of street photography through a cinematic exploration of New York City, and captures the visceral rush, singular perseverance and at times immediate danger customary to these artists.

CHERYL DUNN, Director

Cheryl Dunn is a documentary filmmaker and street photographer based in New York City. Her films have played at numerous film festivals including Tribeca, Edinburgh, Rotterdam, Los Angeles and Havana, and on PBS. Her work has been exhibited in various galleries and museums including Deitch Projects in New York, The Tate Modern in London, and the  “Art in the Streets ” exhibition at the Geffen Contemporary MOCA.  Cheryl was one of the subjects the documentary, book & traveling museum exhibition “Beautiful Losers”. She has had two books of her photographs published - Bicycle Gangs of New York ,and Some Kinda Vocation.

LUCY COOPER, Producer

Lucy has been a producer on a number of high-profile independent films, including “Hesher”, “Transamerica”, and “A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints”, which have gone on to play at Sundance, Cannes, Venice and Berlin film festivals, as well as receive Oscar nominations, and Independent Spirit and Golden Globe wins.  She has also produced a long list of music videos and commercials for brands like Nike, Johnnie Walker, and DIRECTV. 

BRUCE DAVIDSON is undeniably one of the most influential and important photographers of our time. Picking up a camera at the age of ten, Davidson quickly found himself on the streets of Chicago, photographing city life. After attending Rochester Institute of Technology and Yale University, Davidson was drafted in the army and stationed near Paris, where he first met Henri Cartier-Bresson. In 1957, after his service ended, Davidson starting working for Life Magazine and became a full-time member of Magnum in 1958.

From 1958 to 1961, Davidson made some of his most seminal bodies of work, including Brooklyn Gang. After a one-person show at The Museum of Modern Art in 1963, followed by a National Endowment for the Arts grant in 1967, Davidson spent two years photographing in Harlem, resulting in East 100th Street, one of the most powerful documentations of poverty and housing discrimination ever published. In 1980, after living in New York City for 23 years, Davidson turned his camera underground, creating a startling color essay of urban life in Subway.

Classic bodies of work from his 50-year career have been extensively published in monographs and are included in many major public and private fine art collections around the world, and he continues to photograph and produce new bodies of work. He has had one-man exhibitions at The Museum of Modern Art, The Smithsonian Museum of American Art, The Walker Art Center, The International Center of Photography, The Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego, The Aperture Foundation, and The Foundacion Cartier-Bresson in Paris.

ELLIOTT ERWITT is one of the most well known living street photographers. He has been a member of Magnum Photos since 1953, and has over twenty books published of his work. He studied photography at Los Angeles City College and in 1946 met Edward Steichen, Robert Capa and Roy Stryker, who became significant mentors. Erwitt has continued to travel and photograph throughout his life, capturing the famous and the ordinary, the strange and the mundane in his own unmistakable, often humorous style. His books, journalistic essays, and advertisements have been featured in publications around the world and his work has been exhibited at such museums as the Smithsonian, MoMA, Kunsthaus in Zurich, and The Art Institute of Chicago.

JILL FREEDMAN is a highly respected New York City documentary photographer whose award-winning work is included in the permanent collections of The Museum of Modern Art, the International Center of Photography, George Eastman House, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the New York Public Library, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and the Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris, among others. She is known for having completely embedded herself with her subjects, as in her long-term documentary projects on firemen, street cops, and a traveling circus. She has appeared in solo and group exhibitions throughout the world, and has had seven books of her work published.

BRUCE GILDEN’s childhood in Brooklyn endowed him with a keen eye for observing urban behaviors and customs. His curiosity about strong characters and individual peculiarities has been present from the beginning of his career, and he has been photographing on the streets of New York City since 1981. Getting ever closer to his subject, he has established an expressive and theatrical style that presented the world as a vast comedy of manners. His first major project, which he worked on until 1986, focused on Coney Island, and on the intimacy of the sensual, fat or skinny bodies sprawled across the legendary New York beach. There have been several monographs published of his work, including Facing New York (Cornerhouse 1992), Coney Island (1999), and A Beautiful Catastrophe (powerhouse 2005). He has travelled and exhibited widely around the world, and has been a member of Magnum Photos since 1998. He has received numerous awards, including the European Award for Photography, three National Endowment for the Arts fellowships, and a Japan Foundation fellowship.

REBECCA LEPKOFF has been photographing New York City since the late 1930’s. Associated with the Photo League, she captured the ethnic richness of life on the Lower East Side and preserved that culture on vintage silver prints. In the words of Tom Gitterman, “With a background of modern dance and art history, she photographed with a strong sense of light and abstraction and captured the rhythm of the street. Beyond mere documents of a time and place, her images provide greater insight into human existence within the city. Her work captures the energy of the hustle and bustle, the commerce, the elegance and the complexities of modern society and the plight of the individual within it.” Lepkoff’s photographs are included in such prestigious collections as the National Museum of Art (Washington D.C.) the National Gallery of Canada, the Museum of the City of New York, the Bank of America and the Consolidated Freightways, Inc. Collection.”

MARY ELLEN MARK has achieved worldwide visibility through her numerous books, exhibitions and editorial magazine work. She has published photo-essays and portraits in such publications as LIFE, New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, Rolling Stone, and Vanity Fair. For over four decades, she has traveled extensively to make pictures that reflect a high degree of humanism. Today, she is recognized as one of our most respected and influential photographers in the world. Her images of diverse cultures have become landmarks in the field of documentary photography. Her portrayals of Mother Teresa, Indian circuses, and brothels in Bombay were the product of many years of work in India. A photo essay on runaway children in Seattle became the basis of the academy award nominated film STREETWISE, directed and photographed by her husband, Martin Bell. She has published eighteen books, and her photographs have been exhibited worldwide.

Her accolades include the Cornell Capa Award by the International Center of Photography, the Infinity Award for Journalism, an Erna & Victor Hasselblad Foundation Grant, and a Walter Annenberg Grant. Among her other awards are the John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship, the Matrix Award for outstanding woman in the field of film/photography, and the Dr. Erich Salomon Award for outstanding merits in the field of journalistic photography. She was also presented with honorary Doctor of Fine Arts degrees from her Alma Mater, the University of Pennsylvania and the University of the Arts; three fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts; the Photographer of the Year Award from the Friends of Photography; the World Press Award for Outstanding Body of Work Throughout the Years; the Victor Hasselblad Cover Award; two Robert F. Kennedy Awards; and the Creative Arts Award Citation for Photography at Brandeis University.

JEFF MERMELSTEIN is a photographer’s photographer. Schooled on the streets of New York in the instant reflex art of Cartier-Bresson, his pictures are populated by people captured for their own idiosyncrasies and humanity; for their own unique way of walking, talking, eating, working, drinking, celebrating and being. Relentless in his observations, Mermelstein’s photographs challenge us by first appealing to our sense of identification in others who function with all the vagaries of complex human behavior.

Glenn O’Brien wrote that Jeff Mermelstein is “one of the great snapshot artists of all time”. His bibliography includes the three monographs: SideWalk (Dewi Lewis Publishing 1999), No Title Here (powerHouse Books 2003), and Twirl / Run (powerhouse Books 2009). His accomplishments include an Aaron Siskind Foundation Fellowship and The European Publishers Award for Photography, as well as frequent and numerous placement in magazines such as The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, Artforum and DoubleTake His work is in collections including The Art Institute of Chicago, The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, The Buhl Collection, NYC, The International Center of Photography, and The JP Morgan Chase Art Collection

JOEL MEYEROWITZ is an award-winning photographer whose work has appeared in over 350 exhibitions in museums and galleries around the world. He was born in New York in 1938. He began photographing in 1962. As an early advocate of color photography in the mid 1960’s, Meyerowitz was instrumental in changing the attitude toward the use of color photography from one of resistance to nearly universal acceptance. His first book, Cape Light, is considered a classic work of color photography and has sold more than 100,000 copies during its 30-year life. He is the author of 17 other books, including the newly released book by Aperture, Legacy: The Preservation of Wilderness in New York City Parks. Meyerowitz is a two time Guggenheim fellow, a recipient of both the NEA and NEH awards, as well as a recipient of the Deutscher Fotobuchpreis. His work is in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art, the Boston Museum of Fine Art and many others.

MARTHA COOPER picked up photography at the age of 3, graduated high school at the age of 16, and finished college by the age of 19. After becoming a staff photographer for the New York Post in the 1970’s, she began photographing children in bombed-out neighborhoods in lower Manhattan, which later formed the book Street Play. Through these children she learned of graffiti writers, and began to document the very beginnings of street art. She is world-renowned for seminal work Subway Art, in which she almost singlehandedly documented the subway graffiti movement of 1970’s New York. A beloved figure in the street art community, she continues to document graffiti culture. Her work has been published in numerous magazines including National Geographic, Natural History, and Vibe, as well as exhibited in galleries and museums worldwide.

JAMEL SHABAZZ has gained international recognition through his various books, exhibitions, and editorial works documenting urban life and the African American community. Born and raised in Brooklyn, Shabazz picked up his first camera at the age of 15 and began to record the world around him. His massive body of fine art, documentary, and fashion photography has manifested itself in five monographs of his work. In addition to his own photography, Shabazz teaches at numerous community organizations that teach high school students various forms of art, photography, communication, and social responsibility. His photographs are part of permanent collections at the Whitney Museum, the Bronx Museum of the arts and the Schomburg center for research in black culture.

CLAYTON PATTERSON (born October 9, 1948 in Calgary, Alberta, Canada) is a Canadian-born artist, photographer, videographer and folk historian. Since moving to New York City in 1979, his work has focused almost exclusively on documenting the art, life and times of the Lower East Side in Manhattan. in 1980 he began photographing life in the Lower East Side of New York City. In 1985, Patterson began photographing kids from the neighborhood in front of his front door. Over the years, he has taken hundreds of photos, and displaying them on his “Hall of Fame” in his storefront window. in 1980 he began photographing life in the Lower East Side of New York City.In 1985, Patterson began photographing kids from the neighborhood in front of his front door. Over the years, he has taken hundreds of photos, and displaying them on his “Hall of Fame” in his storefront window.

RICKY POWELL, b 1961 is a native New Yorker who has been taking pictures professionally since 1985. Known as one of the leading photographers of the New York music scene, especially rap and hip hop, Ricky has shot numerous performers including Run DMC, the Beastie Boys, LL Cool J, Method Man and Cyprus Hill. his main forte is street photography, Ricky says, “Street photography is like my transistor radio: the play list is infinite.” His public access show ,  Rappin’ With the Rickster  which aired from 1990–1996, has often been called the world’s hippest-ever public access TV show, as Powell gave insight into the artistic phenomena of the day, with an excess of candid footage, impromptu interviews, and a vision of Powell’s New York

BOOGIE - Vladimir Milivojevich, better known as Boogie, b. 1969, is a Serbian photographer . With his camera, Boogie walked the streets day and night, recording the degradation of his city, unruly protests and portraits of skinheads. After winning the United States green card lottery in 1997, Boogie moved from Belgrade to Brooklyn, a week before the war in Kosovo began. He started observing New York’s bleak street side of life with monochrome shots. His book  “It’s all good” ,is one of the best NY photo books of all time.  Shot in New York Citys most notorious neighborhoods—Bushwick, Bedford-Stuyvesant, and Queensbridge—Boogie gained intimate access into a world few dare to venture, a world closed to outsiders, a world of crackheads, junkies, and gangsters.. he has published 4 books since.

MAX KOZLOFF (born 1933) is an American Art Historian, art critic of modern art and photographer. He has been art editor at The Nation, and Executive Editor of Artforum. His essay, “American Painting During the Cold War” is of particular importance to the criticism on American Abstract Expressionism. he became an art photographer, and in the following years held numerous shows and became a photography critic. He received the 1968 Guggenheim Fellowship and later the Infinity Award for Writing in 1990, given by the International Center of Photography.

LUC SANTE (born 1954) is a writer and critic. Born in Verviers, Belgium, Sante emigrated to the United States in the early 1960s. He attended school in New York City, first at Regis High School in Manhattan and later at Columbia University. His books include Low Life (1991), Evidence (1992), The Factory of Facts (1998), Walker Evans (1999), Kill All Your Darlings: Pieces 1990-2005 (2007), and Folk Photography (2009) Sante received a Whiting Writer’s Award in 1989, a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1992-93, a Literature Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 1997, a Grammy for album notes in 1998 (Sante was one of the album note writers for the 1997 re-issue of the Anthology of American Folk Music), and an Infinity Award for writing from the International Center of Photography in 2010

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