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With the recent redesign of Kaleidoscope by visionary Munich-based design studio Bureau Mirko Borsche, we introduced a brand new section of the magazine called Visions. Here, we invite the eye to an enthralling joinery across a hundred pages of visual contributions by artists, curators and image-makers, affirming the magazine’s centrality as a tool to show and experience art.

The photographs that accompany the piece about Sam Falls feature some of his sculptural works and his more recent works on fabric. How did you choose which pieces to include in the photos?

This feature is one of a kind and very much revolving around the concepts that animate Sam’s work. We juxtaposed a selection of his own original travel, research and process imagery, with portraits originally shot by a fantastic LA-based photographer, Nathanael Turner. The stunning visual spreads, of which you can see some exclusive images here, are accompanied by an evocative poem by Jamie Kanzler.

Currently, Sam has a solo show on view at Ballroom Marfa and just started a one-year-long project at Franco Noero gallery in Turin.

“Rather than showing their own well-known work, we offer them the opportunity to share their vision on art.”

Why did KAWS choose to do this “on paper group exhibition on paper” for Kaleidoscope versus something else?

We invited KAWS to conceive a special project for the magazine and he came up with the idea of selecting portraits of a bunch of characters that would make for a memorable imaginary dinner party. All the selected works, including Peter Saul, Mike Kelley, Tadanoori Yokoo and George Condo, are from KAWS’s own amazing collection of painting and drawing.

This is one of the visual experiments that are only possible in the Visions section. Indeed, we think of these visual features also as a way to present the work of very iconic artists, such as KAWS, in an unexpected way. Rather than showing their own well-known work, we offer them the opportunity to share their vision on art.

Imagery by Sam Falls.

Portraits by Nathanael Turner.