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Another key section of the magazine is Mono, a definitive monographic survey each time dedicated to a different artist who is leaving a legacy. The section comprises an essay, an interview, an extensive selection of plates, and a portrait of the artist. We take an in-depth, vertical look to a single artist’s work in a way similar to editing a small reference catalogue encapsulated in the magazine.

Recent Monos were dedicated to Torbjørn Rødland and Ida Ekblad, while in this issue we feature great German painter Albert Oehlen. There is a fantastic essay by John Corbett—a brilliant and eclectic writer, musician and gallery owner—which explains how, across 35 years of practice, Oehlen has explored an impossibly broad range of approaches on painting, with a brilliant understanding of the semiotics of images and a humorous take on the false dichotomy of good and bad taste.

“What is peculiar about Oehlen’s practice, is that it unfolds through a set of constraints and a brutally harsh interior dialogue.”

What is peculiar about Oehlen’s practice, is that it unfolds through a set of constraints and a brutally harsh interior dialogue—setting up a little chess game between the painter and the canvas. This is also addressed in the interview by Fredi Fischli and Niels Olsen, our contributing editors from Zurich, which focuses on Oehlen’s Computer Paintings from the 1990s and his retrospective curated by Massimiliano Gioni currently on view at the New Museum in New York.

From top to bottom:

Albert Oehlen, “Untitled,” 2005, Courtesy of the artist and Luhring Augustine, New York.

Albert Oehlen, “Captain Jack,” 1997, Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin.

Albert Oehlen, “Untitled (Baum 6),” 2014, Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian Gallery, Photo credit: Lothar Schnepf.

Albert Oehlen, “Rivulet,” 2004, Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian Gallery.

Albert Oehlen, “Bad,” 2003, Courtesy of the artist and Zabludowicz Collection, Photo credit: Jörg and Phillip von Bruchhausen.